Are video games art? That we’re even having this conversation means there’s no definitive answer, which means that it comes down to “because I say so!”. A lot of the arguments for video games being art will often interpret the definition of art as being something which can accommodate video games, but before arguing why something can be classified within a specific category, you also have to define what the thing is first.

The video game is still a very recent medium compared to literature or film, which have existed long enough to develop into something that people understand. We still don’t really know what video games are capable of being, because the boundaries are still being pushed. We’re the pioneers, we’re just starting it. Therefore, any artistic merit that video games will ever come to have will only ever be given by students of the subject in years to come, in the same way that the first wave of film critics, like Truffaut, understood film making principles enough to do things with it that hadn’t been done before. Creators often don’t understand their creations as much as their fans. The first art films were made by people who’d studied films that came before in order to understand the process, and then use that process to different ends. That’s how I expect video games will develop. We understand how video games work, but there doesn’t yet to appear to be anyone who’s developed a video game in a way that establishes and redefines the medium in the same way that happened with film.

Comparing video games specifically to film is, I understand, a biased perspective, but in arguing the artistic merits of a genre, there needs to be an example genre with-which to compare it, and film is the closest one.

I don’t know if the definition of a video game will ever be defined in my lifetime, and that’s okay. In maybe a hundred years time, video games will be studied as much, if not more than, film. And its students will understand the important ones, which form a pathway of evolution of techniques that eventually lead to whatever video games have become by that time. The dots can only be connected by looking backwards, and we’re still basically at the beginning of the trail. We need more samples, and that will take time. But we do at least have a reference for how our understanding will develop. We mustn’t get ahead of ourselves; this is how I think video games will come to be considered art, if they ever do. All we can do is stay focused on the video games of today. We have to lay the foundations. Because, compared to the video game players of the future, we don’t know anything at all.

The Well-Red Mage

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“Don’t raise your voice, improve your argument.”
-Desmond Tutu

Greetings, NPCs! We’ve another community event lined up for you.

To articulate our never-ending quest to raise the standard of discussion and civility in the world of gaming, we undertook the first in a series of “Asking Big Questions” posts back in May. In that first entry, the question was “What have you learned since you started blogging?” My heart was warmed by the response we received. Many of you shared your experiences, your anxieties, your histories with us and bared your souls to each other. I found that brand of humanity inspiring; we were transparent and open with our peers and ourselves.

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If you weren’t around or otherwise didn’t participate, I highly suggest you take a look at some of the answers furnished by the great and sometimes very much unsung writers out there among us. Some of them left…

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Published by the Purple Prose Mage

I'm not Batman, but I wish that I were.

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